Ramazan Pide Izmir Turkey

CULTURE: Ramazan Pide ‘Bread is Life’

Note from Catie: Every bit of Turkey and its food revolves around seasons and events. Ramazan is no different! Here in Turkey, there is a special bread made only during the Ramazan, the 30 days of fasting. It is a must have when attending Iftar with locals or even if you aren’t fasting, it’s worth a try.

P.S. – And no, I didn’t spell that wrong. The most common word used is Ramadan but in Turkey, they say Ramazan!


Imagine having gone an entire day without eating, walking into a busy bakery, and being washed with the smell of the most delicious bread. Toasty, soft, warm and slightly sweet, Ramazan pide is a treat that is available in Turkey only once a year. During the Muslim holy month of daylight fasting called Ramazan (or Ramadan), this special bread is at every bakery, churned out at incredible rates. The almost mundane ritual of the loaves sliding in the oven, out and into glass cases, the question, “how many” and the varying answers is as rhythmic as a heartbeat.  The line moves quickly and efficiently as the pide, still warm, is wrapped in paper and handed over to grateful hands. Everyone rushes home to beat the sunset when friends and family gather to break the fast together. 

Ramazan Pide Izmir Turkey
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Like in other majority-Muslim countries, Turkey has a high respect for bread in general, as it holds an important position in life. Bread represents the ability to feed one’s family. In Turkey, it is as ubiquitous as it is fresh and delicious. Bread is shared around the table at most meals and has a starring role in kahvaltı (check out my blog post about Turkish breakfast here). It is made and bought fresh every day. Since it is made without preservatives, it goes stale quickly. 

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But rather than throwing stale bread away (or using it to feed ducks, like my mom would take me to do as a child), Turks share their leftover bread with the less fortunate. If you walk the streets of Turkey long enough, you’ll see bags of bread tied to fences and trees for those who cannot buy the staple for themselves. Even bakeries have systems in which patrons can “pay it forward” by buying an extra loaf to hang up for those who may come in later to ask for free bread. Here in Izmir, there are many who feed the street animals with leftover bread as well. 

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The month of Ramazan is a particular time of being generous and charitable for Muslims. People are encouraged to not only fast during daylight hours, but also to be generous toward the poor: two of the five pillars of Islam.

The very structure of Ramazan pide is a reminder of that community of generosity, as it is perforated to be easily torn and shared around the iftar table. Alongside the various Turkish dishes at the table, this bread is a great absorbent of flavorful sauces, a structured vehicle for sandwiches, or (my personal favorite) a treat all its own, slathered in fresh butter. However you eat it, the bread itself is an enduring symbol of sustenance, generosity, life.

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Now tell me:

  • Have you ever had Ramazan pide?
  • Do you have a favorite way to eat it?
  • What does bread represent to you? 

Share your thoughts in the comments below!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Nia McRay from @Tastes_Like_Turkey

I am a lover of words and stories, student of culture, amateur photographer, adult cross-cultural kid, English tutor to TCKs (Third Culture Kids), and aspiring foodie. We will probably be instant friends if you give me good coffee, invite me to cook with you, or start a conversation with me about personalities, culture, and how the two intersect. I’m a life-long nerd, believer, and creative-in-the-works. I am all about the journey, so traveling and cross-cultural living is always something that has captured my heart and inspired my imagination. 

In 2016, after teaching in an inner-city school and needing a change of pace, I spent a year abroad in Izmir, Turkey with a friend. I absolutely fell in love with the city and the people. The conveniences of a big city with a friendly, slow-pace-of-life atmosphere is all found between the mountains and the sea. What’s not to love? So, after my year of adventure, I knew I wanted to come back to Izmir to live. 

Positioned on the perch of Asia, Europe, and the Middle East, Turkey is both a mix of cultures, and a unique culture all its own. The more I learn, the more I want to learn, and this desire to learn is what drives me to write. As a pretty quiet person, I write to learn, to discover, and to process. As someone who grew up in a cross-cultural context, Turkey’s diversity and mix of cultures is something I personally relate to. Plus, if you’ve ever tasted Turkish food, you know that it is definitely something to write home about. I’m really grateful for the opportunity to contribute to the Funks’ blog and to grow and learn in the process.

EX-PAT FOOD: Pork-less Red beans and rice

Note from Catie: While I live in Turkey, I am a born and raised Southern American gal, and specifically to Louisiana! Which makes this blog post especially near and dear to my heart! I grew up on a good bowl of red beans and rice. And well, a good biscuit that melts in my mouth is always appreciated!

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This month, I’m creating another adaptation dish! Native to Louisianan cuisine, red beans and rice is a classic dish and a testament to the rich flavors and readily-available ingredients used in the cooking of the bayou. Cajun cuisine is an American mix of countryside French cuisine brought via Canada, African American, Spanish, and Native American influences using the ingredients native to the bayou.

After Hurricane Katrina in 2005, droves of people who were displaced from their homes in Louisiana settled in my hometown: the metro-Atlanta area. Thankfully, they brought their cooking with them. So, although Cajun cuisine isn’t native to my hometown or my parents’, it’s still a style of food that reminds me of childhood and the comfort of gathering with community. 

In this red beans and rice recipe, I incorporate ingredients found here in Izmir. Sucuk (pronounced soo-jook) is a Turkish sausage made from beef. Check out the blog post I wrote last month to learn more about the spices in sucuk, and for another recipe with this flavorful sausage! It makes a great substitute for the delicious andouille sausage usually used to make red beans and rice, and the flavors really complement the Cajun seasonings that go in this dish.

Sometimes, in Turkey it can be hard to find celery, one of the necessary “Holy Trinity” starters for Cajun stews. I have found, however, that if I’m willing to buy a few celery roots (which is the part of the celery sold in markets in Turkey), I can usually piece together enough of the thin stalks left on the root to make up enough to start off my stews. Additionally, depending on what is available, I sometimes use red beans (often called Mexican beans in Turkey) or kidney beans if red beans are unavailable. Both work well in the dish, and you can even mix the two if you’re feeling adventurous!  

I also include a bonus recipe for an adaptation of “done buttered biscuits” that are dangerously easy. Don’t be surprised if you find yourself making them for every meal of the day! I substitute the usual sour cream for yogurt, and add a cup of cheese to the usual recipe. 

The best thing about a hearty dish like this is that it is so simple to make and easy to double and share with a crowd! I doubled this recipe and it fed 8 adults and 6 kids! 

Pork-less Red Beans and Rice

Ingredients:

  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1 link of Sucuk, thinly sliced
  • 2 (16 ounce) cans red beans
  • 3 cups chicken broth
  • 2-3 Celery stalks
  • 1 Green bell pepper
  • 1 Yellow Onion
  • 3 cloves Garlic
  • 1 Bay leaf
  • 2 tbsp Parsley, fresh
  • 1/4 tsp Sage, ground
  • 1 Tbsp Paprika
  • 1 Tsp Oregano
  • 1 Tsp Cumin
  • Salt, to taste
  • Black pepper, to taste
  • Red pepper flakes, to taste
  • Tabasco sauce, to taste
  • 1 cup white rice

Directions:

  1. Prepare the rice as normal, with two cups water. Boil, cover, reduce heat to low and let cook for 20 minutes. Remove from heat, keeping rice covered as it’s set aside. 
  2. As rice is cooking, heat olive oil over medium heat in Dutch oven or large stockpot.
  3. Add in the sucuk until it starts to brown.
  4. Add in chopped onion, green bell pepper, and celery. Cook 5 minutes until they start to soften.
  5. Add in garlic and spices, stir and cook until fragrant. 
  6. Pour in chicken broth and red beans. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to low. Simmer covered for 15 minutes. 
  7. Remove lid and let the stew reduce, mashing some of the beans to help thicken. Add tabasco sauce, and add salt and pepper to taste.
  8. Serve over rice with done buttered biscuit. Garnish with fresh parsley.
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BONUS: Cheesy, Done Buttered Biscuits

Ingredients: 

  • 113 grams butter, melted
  • 1 cup yogurt, plain
  • 2 cups Bisquick mix (recipe below)
  • 1 cup shredded cheese of your choice (I used kaşar)

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 350 F/175 C. Grease or line a muffin tin.
  2. Mix all ingredients until fully incorporated.
  3. Bake for 25-30 minutes until lightly browned.
Bisquick Mix Ingredients:
  • 6 cups all-purpose flour, sifted
  • 3 Tbsp. baking powder
  • 1 Tbsp salt
  • ½ cup butter, cold cut in cubes
Directions:
  1. Whisk together dry ingredients, then cut utter into flour mixture until the texture of course sand. 
  2. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to four months. 
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Now tell me:

  • Have you ever updated a recipe you grew up with based on what’s available where you live now?
  • What’s a dish you grew up eating that didn’t originate in your hometown?
  • Have you tried this red beans and rice recipe?
  • How did it turn out for you?

Share your thoughts in the comments below!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Nia McRay from @Tastes_Like_Turkey

I am a lover of words and stories, student of culture, amateur photographer, adult cross-cultural kid, English tutor to TCKs (Third Culture Kids), and aspiring foodie. We will probably be instant friends if you give me good coffee, invite me to cook with you, or start a conversation with me about personalities, culture, and how the two intersect. I’m a life-long nerd, believer, and creative-in-the-works. I am all about the journey, so traveling and cross-cultural living is always something that has captured my heart and inspired my imagination. 

In 2016, after teaching in an inner-city school and needing a change of pace, I spent a year abroad in Izmir, Turkey with a friend. I absolutely fell in love with the city and the people. The conveniences of a big city with a friendly, slow-pace-of-life atmosphere is all found between the mountains and the sea. What’s not to love? So, after my year of adventure, I knew I wanted to come back to Izmir to live. 

Positioned on the perch of Asia, Europe, and the Middle East, Turkey is both a mix of cultures, and a unique culture all its own. The more I learn, the more I want to learn, and this desire to learn is what drives me to write. As a pretty quiet person, I write to learn, to discover, and to process. As someone who grew up in a cross-cultural context, Turkey’s diversity and mix of cultures is something I personally relate to. Plus, if you’ve ever tasted Turkish food, you know that it is definitely something to write home about. I’m really grateful for the opportunity to contribute to the Funks’ blog and to grow and learn in the process.

FOOD: Wintertime Cabbage, Sucuk, + Potato Fry

Note from Catie: I recently tried out this recipe and loved it! Hardy but also light! We only had sweet potatoes on hand (which we pay crazy extra for in Turkey) and the recipe was just at delicious! You can always add your own extra toppings or maybe even some sesame seeds like we did! Awesome job Nia on another great recipe!

It’s March; daffodils pop up persistently through the cold earth to remind us, despite the chilly winds, that spring will return, that it’s just around the corner. If you’re in the Northern Hemisphere, maybe, like me, you’re tired of the cold weather, tired of the process of bundling up every time you go out the door, and maybe even tired of the same soups and stews you’ve been making through the winter.  When I still want something hearty and warm on a blustery March evening, this fry is an easy and filling meal I can whip up on a weeknight and is surprisingly good reheated. It’s adapted from an Irish dish, so it’s a great option for a St. Patrick’s Day dinner on the 17th

The biggest difference in this recipe from the Irish version is the replacement of “bangers” with sucuk (“soo-jook”), a fermented Turkish sausage made from beef that is full of flavor. You will find sucuk at any butcher’s shop in Turkey with it’s delicious mix of cayenne pepper, garlic, sumac, cumin, and, of course, plenty of salt, along with a host of other spices. It is commonly cooked with fried eggs for kahvalti (Turkish breakfast) or as a topping on pide (Turkish pizza). You can also easily find it at a grill-out on a hot Izmir summer afternoon.  Sucuk is high in fat and sodium, so my recipe doesn’t add salt or much other fat to the dish. However, if you’re opting for a healthier sausage, like a chicken or reduced sodium sausage, you may want some more salt and/or fat to your fry. 

To get your potatoes and cabbage (which is in season right now in Turkey!) to soak that delicious sucuk flavor in, you want to make sure you fry your sucuk first (and remove them from the pan so they don’t burn) add in a little olive oil, and fry your potato cubes in the remaining fat. The hot fat will not only fry your potatoes beautifully, but also add some rich flavor to them. If you are using a non-sucuk sausage, be sure to add garlic to your fry, as well as red pepper flakes if you like a little heat. 

I also add a little vinegar to introduce some acid and brighten the dish. Alternatively, you could add some citrus juice to cut the heaviness of this fry. If you’re using a chicken or pork sausage, you could also experiment by substituting apple cider vinegar for red wine vinegar. Don’t forget to let me know how your fry turned out in the comments below!

Sucuk Potato Cabbage Fry

  • 2 links sucuk, sliced (Or chicken or pork sausage)
  • 1 lb potatoes peeled and chopped into ½ inch cubes
  • ½ cabbage head, chopped
  • 1 tbsp Olive oil
  • 2 Tbsp red wine vinegar
  • Salt, Pepper, garlic powder, and paprika to taste
  1. In a large skillet or dutch oven, fry the sliced sucuk until lightly browned and released fat. Remove sucuk to a plate.
  2. Add enough olive oil to bring total fat to ¼ inch. Mix and allow to heat up. Add potatoes, stirring occasionally to brown all sides of the potatoes.
  3. Once potatoes are mostly soft, add in the cabbage and return the sucuk to the pan. Stir and allow the cabbage to begin to soften. (If adding garlic, add now)
  4. Add the vinegar and deglaze the pan, scratching up the brown bits on the bottom of the pan with a wooden spoon. 
  5. Add paprika, salt and pepper to taste. Afiyet Olsun!

Now tell me:

  • What about you?
  • What’s your favorite type of sausage?
  • Can you find sucuk where you live?
  • Have you tried this fry? How did it turn out for you?
  • What would you change?

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Nia McRay from @Tastes_Like_Turkey

I am a lover of words and stories, student of culture, amateur photographer, adult cross-cultural kid, English tutor to TCKs (Third Culture Kids), and aspiring foodie. We will probably be instant friends if you give me good coffee, invite me to cook with you, or start a conversation with me about personalities, culture, and how the two intersect. I’m a life-long nerd, believer, and creative-in-the-works. I am all about the journey, so traveling and cross-cultural living is always something that has captured my heart and inspired my imagination. 

In 2016, after teaching in an inner-city school and needing a change of pace, I spent a year abroad in Izmir, Turkey with a friend. I absolutely fell in love with the city and the people. The conveniences of a big city with a friendly, slow-pace-of-life atmosphere is all found between the mountains and the sea. What’s not to love? So, after my year of adventure, I knew I wanted to come back to Izmir to live. 

Positioned on the perch of Asia, Europe, and the Middle East, Turkey is both a mix of cultures, and a unique culture all its own. The more I learn, the more I want to learn, and this desire to learn is what drives me to write. As a pretty quiet person, I write to learn, to discover, and to process. As someone who grew up in a cross-cultural context, Turkey’s diversity and mix of cultures is something I personally relate to. Plus, if you’ve ever tasted Turkish food, you know that it is definitely something to write home about. I’m really grateful for the opportunity to contribute to the Funks’ blog and to grow and learn in the process.

Turkey Turkish Asure Noah's Pudding

FOOD: Aşure, a beautiful community tradition

Perhaps you’ve heard the story before: a great evil, a divinely sent flood, and a man with a zoo on a boat. 

It’s one of the oldest stories told, a story that takes many different forms, but what makes it unique is its ubiquity. In every inhabited continent, there is a myth of a great flood: from the Inca’s tale of Pachakuti, to the Mesopotamian story of Gilgamesh, from the strikingly similar stories of Nu’u in Hawaiian mythology, Noah in the Torah, Tumbainot of the Maasai, and Nuh in the Qur’an, to the starkly different stories from the Egyptians, Chinese, Finnish, and Ojibwe

Stories are one of the beautiful things that connects us all as people.

Despite the variety of ways our different cultures play out in the way we tell stories, or even the focus of our stories, this diversity can lead us to see the unifying artistic and creative elements of story-telling. Stories can help us understand one another.  The more we look at the stories we all tell, the more we can see the similarities we share in our experiences and histories. The dish I want to introduce you to today has a similar unifying quality. 

Aşure [pronounced “ah-shoor-eh”] is a Turkish dessert that has its roots in this story of the flood as found in the Qur’an. It is said that when the passengers of the ark were on the brink of starving, Nuh (Noah) mixed together all the leftover grains, nuts, beans and fruit to make what would be dubbed “the oldest dessert.” Together he and the other passengers ate, celebrating the end of the flood, and the next day Allah (God) made the waters of the flood recede.  

Today, while this day is celebrated differently by different sects of Islam, Turks generally share this dessert with neighbors, family, and friends in goodwill and kindness in the Islamic month of Muharram, especially on the 10th day of Muharram [Ashura]. This year, that landed on August 29th. Some Islamic traditions hold that a variety of miracles and divine interactions happened on this day throughout history, including the exodus of the Jews from Egypt. 

Aşure, like the flood narrative itself, is a picture of unity and diversity.

A dessert meant to be shared with neighbors, coworkers, friends and family, aşure is one unified dish made up of surprisingly varied ingredients (like fruit, grains and beans!). Likewise, despite the vast differences in the details of the flood narratives around the world, they all hold a unified history, and are shared from generation to generation. Each tells of a great being acting in response to some provocation to flood the world, leaving a few survivors. While the details of who that great being was, what provoked the flood, who survived, and how they survived differ greatly, those same differences helped create the variety of cultures we see in the world today. 

As easily identifiable markers of culture, food and story-telling have always had this unifying effect. What culturally significant moments do you participate in that involve food and/or story-telling? Is there a holiday that your family celebrates with specific food? Is there a time when neighbors, friends or family gather and share stories of religious, familial, or national significance? Aşure is a religiously significant dish shared with neighbors and friends regardless of their religious background. What’s one way you can invite someone new into your traditions this year?

What’s in Aşure?

Turkey Turkish Asure Noah's Pudding

Aşure is a porridge with a lovely fall taste (similar to cinnamon oatmeal), and a wide variety of textures. if you are an expat in Turkey, you may find yourself easily overwhelmed by the sheer amount you receive from your neighbors. But since it is full of whole grains, beans, and fruit, you can eat this dessert with less guilt than my previous cookie recipes!

The very nature of aşure is that it doesn’t have one specific recipe. Everyone’s aşure is slightly different based on personal taste and what’s on hand. Here are the general categories of the ingredients of aşure, and some options of what you can put in yours. Mix and match! Try some different combinations and let me know in the comments what your favorite is!

  • Grains: Barley, Wheat, bulgur, and/or rice
  • Beans: White beans and/or chickpeas
  • Dried Fruit: Dates, dried figs, dried apricots, dried cranberries, raisins, and/or other dried fruits
  • Seeds + Spices + Seasonings: Anise seed, sesame seeds, black cumin seeds, cardamom, cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, allspice, rose water, and/or orange blossom water + a sweetener like honey (one could also use maple syrup, sugar, turbinado, or a sugar substitute like stevia)
  • Nuts: Pine nuts, walnuts, almonds and/or pistachios
  • Fresh Fruit: Pomegranate kernels, orange (or orange peel), lemon (or lemon peel)

Start with soaking the beans, raisins and grain separately overnight. Then cook the beans on the stovetop in water, add the grains, and let it thicken. Then add fruit, spices, and nuts until the porridge comes together. Here are links to some more specific recipes if you struggle not having a specific recipe to work from. 

All Recipes Asure

TurkishFoodie Recipe

Personally, I really enjoy the flavor of aşure. The first few spoonfuls are fascinating as I work my way through the high complexity of textures. But, I can quickly become overwhelmed by the complexity, so I tend to only eat a little at a time. Try making aşure yourself, and tell me what you think! Do you enjoy the complexity of flavors and textures? Which ingredients do you use? 

I hope you make some aşure this fall and winter, and share it with a good story, unifying the people around you.

Now tell me:

What are some ways you bring unity to your community through food and story-telling?

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Nia McRay from @Tastes_Like_Turkey

I am a lover of words and stories, student of culture, amateur photographer, adult cross-cultural kid, English tutor to TCKs (Third Culture Kids), and aspiring foodie. We will probably be instant friends if you give me good coffee, invite me to cook with you, or start a conversation with me about personalities, culture, and how the two intersect. I’m a life-long nerd, believer, and creative-in-the-works. I am all about the journey, so traveling and cross-cultural living is always something that has captured my heart and inspired my imagination. 

In 2016, after teaching in an inner-city school and needing a change of pace, I spent a year abroad in Izmir, Turkey with a friend. I absolutely fell in love with the city and the people. The conveniences of a big city with a friendly, slow-pace-of-life atmosphere is all found between the mountains and the sea. What’s not to love? So, after my year of adventure, I knew I wanted to come back to Izmir to live. 

Positioned on the perch of Asia, Europe, and the Middle East, Turkey is both a mix of cultures, and a unique culture all its own. The more I learn, the more I want to learn, and this desire to learn is what drives me to write. As a pretty quiet person, I write to learn, to discover, and to process. As someone who grew up in a cross-cultural context, Turkey’s diversity and mix of cultures is something I personally relate to. Plus, if you’ve ever tasted Turkish food, you know that it is definitely something to write home about. I’m really grateful for the opportunity to contribute to the Funks’ blog and to grow and learn in the process.

Turkish Breakfast Kahvaltı Turkey

FOOD: Let’s ‘Do’ Turkish Breakfast [Kahvaltı]

Note: I, Catie, am so excited that Nia’s amazing article will be partnered with a video coming Friday via FollowingTheFunks YouTube! Stay tuned!!! But until then you can get a quick peek at another Turkish Breakfast we had in Kalkan too here.

A Turkish friend asked me one day if Americans really wake up at 6:00 am to an alarm clock, have cornflakes and coffee for breakfast, and then head off to work like they do in the movies. A laugh erupted from my lips. Compared to the sprawling table of a traditional Turkish breakfast, a bowl of cornflakes must have seemed insufficient to count as a meal.  

When you talk about eating a meal in Turkish, you use the verb yemek for “to eat.” However, when you talk about breakfast, you use the verb yapmak for “to do/make.” It has a similar feeling to the phrase “let’s do brunch.” And in fact, Turkish breakfast can be much more of an event than a simple meal.

Turkish Breakfast Kahvaltı Turkey

Of course, on a workday, one may grab a simit (bagel-like bread covered in sesame seeds) or a breakfast sandwich on the way to the office, and there are even pre-packaged breakfasts with the essentials, or single person plates at restaurants. But, the true kahvaltı experience, like much else in Turkey, is shared. Late on Saturday or Sunday mornings, one can easily find a family of several generations gathered around a great spread of foods in the center of the table feasting together. 

What makes a Turkish breakfast so delicious is the freshness of all the ingredients.

Turkish Breakfast Kahvaltı Turkey

From the fruits and veggies to cheeses and honey, a good breakfast is a smorgasbord of incredibly fresh homemade ingredients… this is perhaps why people in the city will travel to surrounding villages for a village breakfast in a garden surrounded by the plants from which their breakfast has come.  It can be a treat for kids to be greeted by the chickens and goats from which their eggs and cheeses came.

I mean, you can certainly settle for the café in an airport or bus station to get a decent breakfast, but if you’re visiting Turkey, you MUST find your way out to one of these village breakfasts to get the best and freshest kahvaltı available.

If you haven’t ‘done’ Turkish breakfast before, let me take you on a tour of the kahvaltı table.   

Kahvaltı is the word we use for breakfast in Turkish, but it literally means “under coffee” or “before coffee.” It’s the meal you eat before you drink your first cup of Turkish coffee.  Like me, some Americans can’t imagine breakfast without coffee, and may wonder what people drink in Turkey to wake up. This brings us to the first essential part of Turkish breakfast: çay. 

Turkish Breakfast Kahvaltı Turkey

The Essentials

Çay

Usually, a çay damlik (the double kettle that Turkish tea is brewed in) is left at the table so everyone can have countless refills of çay as they slowly graze on their breakfast. 

Turkish Breakfast Kahvaltı Turkey

Bread 

Bread is the vehicle of Turkish breakfast and the highlight. Turks have perfected the art of bread making, and kahvaltı can be a show of some of the best breads and pastries. The range is from simple white bread slices, to soft rolls, whole wheat, sourdough, village bread, pita bread. I’ve even had French toast with kahvaltı! Pastries vary just as much, ranging from fluffy and light pastries stuffed with ground beef, cheeses, spinach, potatoes, or eggplant to heavier lasagna-like pastries, from the bagel-like sesame-covered gevrek (also known as simit in the rest of Turkey) to the light and fluffy pişi (fried dough pictured above) which is my personal favorite. 

Turkish Breakfast Kahvaltı Turkey
Pişi: Fried Bread
Turkish Breakfast Kahvaltı Turkey
Gevrek/Simit
Turkish Breakfast Kahvaltı Turkey
Turkish Breakfast Kahvaltı Turkey
Sigara Boreği: Fried Roll with Cheese in the middle

Raw Veggies 

Tomatoes and cucumbers are traditional, and are often accompanied by fresh greens like arugula. 

Turkish Breakfast Kahvaltı Turkey

Eggs 

There are a plethora of ways eggs are prepared for breakfast in Turkey. Boiled eggs are popular, as are fried eggs, which can come plain or include sucuk [pronounced “soo-jook”] (Turkish sausage made from beef with a good helping of garlic) or other cuts of meat. Other options include: scrambled eggs, omelets, and the lovely menemen (a mix of eggs, tomatoes, peppers, salça and spices, pictured above).

Turkish Breakfast Kahvaltı Turkey

Olives

Usually both green and black olives are available at kahvaltı. As someone who never ate olives in the States, the olives here have slowly begun to grow on me. One place I’ve been for kahvaltı even had pink olives!

Turkish Breakfast Kahvaltı Turkey
Turkish Breakfast Kahvaltı Turkey

Cheeses

Cheeses range widely in hardness, saltiness, and sharpness. Sometimes, you can even find fried cheese, or a melty cheese and cornmeal dish muhlama to dip your bread in. There are usually at least a few types of cheeses when you go out to a restaurant for kahvaltı, but in someone’s home, there may be fewer options. 

Turkish Breakfast Kahvaltı Turkey

Savory Items

Salça 

A flavorful tomato and/or pepper paste that can range from mild to spicy. 

Turkish Breakfast Kahvaltı Turkey

Fresh Butter

Sometimes the best toppings are the simplest.

Turkish Breakfast Kahvaltı Turkey

Olive oil + Breakfast Spices 

The combination of fresh olive oil and this mix of spices is not something you’ll find at every kahvaltı place, but it is certainly one of my new favorites.

Turkish Breakfast Kahvaltı Turkey
Turkish Breakfast Kahvaltı Turkey
Zahter Spice: You dip your bread in the olive oil then into this spice.

Yogurt

Turkish Breakfast Kahvaltı Turkey

Cooked Veggies 

Potatoes may take the form of French fries, roasted potatoes, or even boiled potatoes with herbs.  I also particularly enjoy when roasted eggplant and peppers are a part of the spread. 

Turkish Breakfast Kahvaltı Turkey

Sweet Spreads

Honey + Kaymak (clotted cream)

Tastes like decadence first thing in the morning. 

Turkish Breakfast Kahvaltı Turkey

Jams

Whatever is in stock or in season. Strawberry, cherry, fig, apricot, blackberry, mulberry… the possibilities are nearly endless!

Turkish Breakfast Kahvaltı Turkey
Turkish Breakfast Kahvaltı Turkey

Nutella

Because who doesn’t want to start their day with a little chocolate?

Turkish Breakfast Kahvaltı Turkey

Tahin & Pekmez

Often times the tahini and grape molasses are poured into the same bowl and need to be stirred to get the right combination of sweet and nutty. 

Ok, we have to hear from you!!!

  • If you have had Turkish breakfast, what else have you had that I didn’t write about?
  • If you haven’t had Turkish breakfast, what is something you haven’t tried for breakfast before that you might try after seeing Turkish breakfast?

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Nia McRay from @Tastes_Like_Turkey

I am a lover of words and stories, student of culture, amateur photographer, adult cross-cultural kid, English tutor to TCKs (Third Culture Kids), and aspiring foodie. We will probably be instant friends if you give me good coffee, invite me to cook with you, or start a conversation with me about personalities, culture, and how the two intersect. I’m a life-long nerd, believer, and creative-in-the-works. I am all about the journey, so traveling and cross-cultural living is always something that has captured my heart and inspired my imagination. 

In 2016, after teaching in an inner-city school and needing a change of pace, I spent a year abroad in Izmir, Turkey with a friend. I absolutely fell in love with the city and the people. The conveniences of a big city with a friendly, slow-pace-of-life atmosphere is all found between the mountains and the sea. What’s not to love? So, after my year of adventure, I knew I wanted to come back to Izmir to live. 

Positioned on the perch of Asia, Europe, and the Middle East, Turkey is both a mix of cultures, and a unique culture all its own. The more I learn, the more I want to learn, and this desire to learn is what drives me to write. As a pretty quiet person, I write to learn, to discover, and to process. As someone who grew up in a cross-cultural context, Turkey’s diversity and mix of cultures is something I personally relate to. Plus, if you’ve ever tasted Turkish food, you know that it is definitely something to write home about. I’m really grateful for the opportunity to contribute to the Funks’ blog and to grow and learn in the process.