Gozleme Turkey

TURKISH FOOD: Gözleme – a dish of Adaptation, Convenience, and Versatility

Note from Catie: If you have been around here, even for just a little bit, you will notice food is an important part of Turkish culture and the Funk family LOVES food! From Turkish breakfast to the special Ramazan bread, every bit of Turkey and its food revolves around seasons and events. Gözleme is one of the simpler yet filling choices. I like to call it the ‘fast food’ of Turkey.


Gozleme Turkey

The drive-thru is a concept that differentiates American culture from others. Both a perpetuator and reflection of many American values, the drive-thru is nearly synonymous with the idea of fast food. If your restaurant has a drive-thru, it can very easily be categorized as fast-food, and if it doesn’t, it is not.

American’s love for independence, instant gratification, priority of efficiency, and multi-tasking can all be seen in the idea of the drive-thru. 

While I have yet to see a drive-thru in Turkey, fast, convenient food does exist. Of course, there are foreign chains like McDonalds and Dominos serving up American-style burgers, fries, pizza.

However, if you’re looking for Turkish fast food, there are some great comfort food options, one of my favorites being gözleme.

Gözleme is a very thin flatbread stuffed with an array of various toppings. It is extremely versatile and can be found at the kahvaltı table, being sold at the open-air pazar as shoppers bargain for produce and home goods, and even at a sit-down restaurant. Some traditional toppings include cheese and spinach, potatoes and spices, ground beef and onions. However, I’ve also had some delicious dessert gözleme including tahini and sugar, or chocolate.

Depending on region and season, you can find a wide array of fillings for gözleme. If the American drive-thru represents independence, multi-tasking, and instant gratification, the Turkish gözleme displays adaptation, convenience, and versatility. 

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I’m convinced that one of the best parts of eating gözleme is watching the women who make it.

It’s incredible to watch the deft fingers gather and roll a small ball of dough into a paper-thin circle, flip it over a broomstick-like rolling pin, cover it with toppings, fold it in half, brush it lightly with oil and flip it over the griddle.

The final product can be sliced up like a quesadilla, rolled up like a dürüm, or served flat on a plate with a slice of lemon. It is endlessly versatile, can adapt to personal taste or to be a part of a meal or snack at any time of the day, and is convenient to take on the go. 

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The flatbread itself is very simple: usually an unleavened mix of flour and water. If you visit Turkey, you’ll often see it advertised as a “Turkish pancake,” but don’t be fooled. This flatbread is a distinct food all its own. To me, it is more akin to a very thin flour tortilla: slightly stretchy and quickly giving in to a satisfying tear which is especially lovely with melted cheese stringing between the halves. 

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Some argue that the word “gözleme” derives from the root word “göz” meaning “compartment” (or, more commonly, “eye”). The logic is that the inside of the gözleme is like a compartment for the fillings inside. However, the full word “gözleme” in Turkish means “to patrol/to spy/to eye” rather than “to compartmentalize.”

There is, however, another theory that I tend to lean towards.

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Other sources argue that the word “gözleme” comes from the word “közleme” which means to barbeque, grill or cook over embers. It’s easy to see where the food got its name, as it is grilled on a large, round griddle. But how did the word “közleme” become “gözleme”? 

Language, like cuisine, is an ever-shifting, -growing, and -adapting entity. One of the things that cause language to shift is ease of pronunciation. In fact, a similar shift from “g” sound to the “k” sound happened in the Proto-Indo-European language in the shift to the Germanic language that eventually became English.

{Ok, I know my language-loving nerd side is showing, but hang with me. (If you want to geek out with me, check out my more detailed explanation at the end of this post.*) }

Over time, languages shift as people pronounce certain consonants differently depending on the sounds that surround them, so that it is easier to say. For example, when I say “blessed,” it sounds like “blesst” unless I emphasize the second “e” and say “blesséd.” A similar thing happens in Turkish, but where English doesn’t change the spelling of our words based on their pronunciation, Turkish does. So, sometimes a “k” in a word like “renk” (the Turkish word for color) becomes a “g” as in “rengi” (“the color of”). This shift makes the words more comfortable to pronounce. The shift from k to g in “közleme” and “gözleme” is not such a stretch after all! This shift is especially noticeable in the accent of those from in and around Ankara, the capitol city of Turkey. Most people from Ankara pronounce their hometown “Angara” and pronounce the “k” sound as a “g” sound. 

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Like the shift in its name, gözleme is an example of both adaptation and convenience. As a food that has its humble beginnings as a village food, it’s starting to evolve and make its mark as a part of modern Turkish cuisine. Its versatility means that you can eat a smoked salmon and egg breakfast gözleme, an eggplant gözleme as a snack, and a banana, walnut, and honey dessert gözleme and still have come nowhere near exhausting your options for delicious fillings! 

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*A little further explanation for those of you willing to geek out on language with me.

I’ll teach you something I teach my TCK students: to feel where and how words are produced in our mouths and throats. 

In English, we tend to pronounce the same letters differently depending on the circumstances surrounding the letter. We do this in order to make it easier to flow from one sound to another. However, this is not usually denoted in the spelling of a word, which is one reason it’s so hard to learn English. (Some of us are having flashbacks to phonics in elementary school right now.) Try saying the word “bird” out loud. Now say “faked.” Did you hear a difference in the way you pronounced the “d” sounds? 

The “d” in “faked” sounded more like a “t” which is a voiceless, or whispered, sound.  Put your fingers on your throat where your adam’s apple is. Say “d” (not “duh” or “dee”, but try to isolate the sound at the end of “bird”). You should feel your vocal chords hard at work. Now say “t” (not “tuh” or “tee”, the isolated sound at the end of “faked”). You shouldn’t feel your vocal chords moving at all, because “t” is a voiceless sound.

There are several pairs of sounds that are made in the same way with all the same parts of your mouth or throat, the only difference being that one is voiced and one is whispered. Some examples are: d (voiced)/t (whispered), b (voiced)/p (whispered), j (voiced)/ch (whispered), g (voiced)/k (whispered).

Each of those pairs have one voiced and one whispered consonant. In Turkish, the whispered sound is changed to the voiced sound when a vowel is added to the end of a word. There is an exception. Rather than “k” to “g” shift, a “k” that ends a word usually shifts to ğ (the Turkish “soft g”). In Ottoman times, this “soft g” was pronounced in the same part of the throat as “k” and “g,” but these days is often silent or used to lengthen a vowel. So, rather than “köpek” (dog) changing to “köpegi” it changes to “köpeği” (his dog). 

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Now tell me:

  • Have you ever tried gözleme? If so, what is your favorite filling?
  • Do you think the word “gözleme” comes from the word “göz” or “közleme”? Why?
  • What imaginative fillings would you put in gözleme that you haven’t seen before?

Share your thoughts in the comments below!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Nia McRay from @Tastes_Like_Turkey

I am a lover of words and stories, student of culture, amateur photographer, adult cross-cultural kid, English tutor to TCKs (Third Culture Kids), and aspiring foodie. We will probably be instant friends if you give me good coffee, invite me to cook with you, or start a conversation with me about personalities, culture, and how the two intersect. I’m a life-long nerd, believer, and creative-in-the-works. I am all about the journey, so traveling and cross-cultural living is always something that has captured my heart and inspired my imagination. 

In 2016, after teaching in an inner-city school and needing a change of pace, I spent a year abroad in Izmir, Turkey with a friend. I absolutely fell in love with the city and the people. The conveniences of a big city with a friendly, slow-pace-of-life atmosphere is all found between the mountains and the sea. What’s not to love? So, after my year of adventure, I knew I wanted to come back to Izmir to live. 

Positioned on the perch of Asia, Europe, and the Middle East, Turkey is both a mix of cultures, and a unique culture all its own. The more I learn, the more I want to learn, and this desire to learn is what drives me to write. As a pretty quiet person, I write to learn, to discover, and to process. As someone who grew up in a cross-cultural context, Turkey’s diversity and mix of cultures is something I personally relate to. Plus, if you’ve ever tasted Turkish food, you know that it is definitely something to write home about. I’m really grateful for the opportunity to contribute to the Funks’ blog and to grow and learn in the process.

Ramazan Pide Izmir Turkey

CULTURE: Ramazan Pide ‘Bread is Life’

Note from Catie: Every bit of Turkey and its food revolves around seasons and events. Ramazan is no different! Here in Turkey, there is a special bread made only during the Ramazan, the 30 days of fasting. It is a must have when attending Iftar with locals or even if you aren’t fasting, it’s worth a try.

P.S. – And no, I didn’t spell that wrong. The most common word used is Ramadan but in Turkey, they say Ramazan!


Imagine having gone an entire day without eating, walking into a busy bakery, and being washed with the smell of the most delicious bread. Toasty, soft, warm and slightly sweet, Ramazan pide is a treat that is available in Turkey only once a year. During the Muslim holy month of daylight fasting called Ramazan (or Ramadan), this special bread is at every bakery, churned out at incredible rates. The almost mundane ritual of the loaves sliding in the oven, out and into glass cases, the question, “how many” and the varying answers is as rhythmic as a heartbeat.  The line moves quickly and efficiently as the pide, still warm, is wrapped in paper and handed over to grateful hands. Everyone rushes home to beat the sunset when friends and family gather to break the fast together. 

Ramazan Pide Izmir Turkey
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Like in other majority-Muslim countries, Turkey has a high respect for bread in general, as it holds an important position in life. Bread represents the ability to feed one’s family. In Turkey, it is as ubiquitous as it is fresh and delicious. Bread is shared around the table at most meals and has a starring role in kahvaltı (check out my blog post about Turkish breakfast here). It is made and bought fresh every day. Since it is made without preservatives, it goes stale quickly. 

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But rather than throwing stale bread away (or using it to feed ducks, like my mom would take me to do as a child), Turks share their leftover bread with the less fortunate. If you walk the streets of Turkey long enough, you’ll see bags of bread tied to fences and trees for those who cannot buy the staple for themselves. Even bakeries have systems in which patrons can “pay it forward” by buying an extra loaf to hang up for those who may come in later to ask for free bread. Here in Izmir, there are many who feed the street animals with leftover bread as well. 

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The month of Ramazan is a particular time of being generous and charitable for Muslims. People are encouraged to not only fast during daylight hours, but also to be generous toward the poor: two of the five pillars of Islam.

The very structure of Ramazan pide is a reminder of that community of generosity, as it is perforated to be easily torn and shared around the iftar table. Alongside the various Turkish dishes at the table, this bread is a great absorbent of flavorful sauces, a structured vehicle for sandwiches, or (my personal favorite) a treat all its own, slathered in fresh butter. However you eat it, the bread itself is an enduring symbol of sustenance, generosity, life.

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Now tell me:

  • Have you ever had Ramazan pide?
  • Do you have a favorite way to eat it?
  • What does bread represent to you? 

Share your thoughts in the comments below!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Nia McRay from @Tastes_Like_Turkey

I am a lover of words and stories, student of culture, amateur photographer, adult cross-cultural kid, English tutor to TCKs (Third Culture Kids), and aspiring foodie. We will probably be instant friends if you give me good coffee, invite me to cook with you, or start a conversation with me about personalities, culture, and how the two intersect. I’m a life-long nerd, believer, and creative-in-the-works. I am all about the journey, so traveling and cross-cultural living is always something that has captured my heart and inspired my imagination. 

In 2016, after teaching in an inner-city school and needing a change of pace, I spent a year abroad in Izmir, Turkey with a friend. I absolutely fell in love with the city and the people. The conveniences of a big city with a friendly, slow-pace-of-life atmosphere is all found between the mountains and the sea. What’s not to love? So, after my year of adventure, I knew I wanted to come back to Izmir to live. 

Positioned on the perch of Asia, Europe, and the Middle East, Turkey is both a mix of cultures, and a unique culture all its own. The more I learn, the more I want to learn, and this desire to learn is what drives me to write. As a pretty quiet person, I write to learn, to discover, and to process. As someone who grew up in a cross-cultural context, Turkey’s diversity and mix of cultures is something I personally relate to. Plus, if you’ve ever tasted Turkish food, you know that it is definitely something to write home about. I’m really grateful for the opportunity to contribute to the Funks’ blog and to grow and learn in the process.

EX-PAT FOOD: Pork-less Red beans and rice

Note from Catie: While I live in Turkey, I am a born and raised Southern American gal, and specifically to Louisiana! Which makes this blog post especially near and dear to my heart! I grew up on a good bowl of red beans and rice. And well, a good biscuit that melts in my mouth is always appreciated!

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This month, I’m creating another adaptation dish! Native to Louisianan cuisine, red beans and rice is a classic dish and a testament to the rich flavors and readily-available ingredients used in the cooking of the bayou. Cajun cuisine is an American mix of countryside French cuisine brought via Canada, African American, Spanish, and Native American influences using the ingredients native to the bayou.

After Hurricane Katrina in 2005, droves of people who were displaced from their homes in Louisiana settled in my hometown: the metro-Atlanta area. Thankfully, they brought their cooking with them. So, although Cajun cuisine isn’t native to my hometown or my parents’, it’s still a style of food that reminds me of childhood and the comfort of gathering with community. 

In this red beans and rice recipe, I incorporate ingredients found here in Izmir. Sucuk (pronounced soo-jook) is a Turkish sausage made from beef. Check out the blog post I wrote last month to learn more about the spices in sucuk, and for another recipe with this flavorful sausage! It makes a great substitute for the delicious andouille sausage usually used to make red beans and rice, and the flavors really complement the Cajun seasonings that go in this dish.

Sometimes, in Turkey it can be hard to find celery, one of the necessary “Holy Trinity” starters for Cajun stews. I have found, however, that if I’m willing to buy a few celery roots (which is the part of the celery sold in markets in Turkey), I can usually piece together enough of the thin stalks left on the root to make up enough to start off my stews. Additionally, depending on what is available, I sometimes use red beans (often called Mexican beans in Turkey) or kidney beans if red beans are unavailable. Both work well in the dish, and you can even mix the two if you’re feeling adventurous!  

I also include a bonus recipe for an adaptation of “done buttered biscuits” that are dangerously easy. Don’t be surprised if you find yourself making them for every meal of the day! I substitute the usual sour cream for yogurt, and add a cup of cheese to the usual recipe. 

The best thing about a hearty dish like this is that it is so simple to make and easy to double and share with a crowd! I doubled this recipe and it fed 8 adults and 6 kids! 

Pork-less Red Beans and Rice

Ingredients:

  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1 link of Sucuk, thinly sliced
  • 2 (16 ounce) cans red beans
  • 3 cups chicken broth
  • 2-3 Celery stalks
  • 1 Green bell pepper
  • 1 Yellow Onion
  • 3 cloves Garlic
  • 1 Bay leaf
  • 2 tbsp Parsley, fresh
  • 1/4 tsp Sage, ground
  • 1 Tbsp Paprika
  • 1 Tsp Oregano
  • 1 Tsp Cumin
  • Salt, to taste
  • Black pepper, to taste
  • Red pepper flakes, to taste
  • Tabasco sauce, to taste
  • 1 cup white rice

Directions:

  1. Prepare the rice as normal, with two cups water. Boil, cover, reduce heat to low and let cook for 20 minutes. Remove from heat, keeping rice covered as it’s set aside. 
  2. As rice is cooking, heat olive oil over medium heat in Dutch oven or large stockpot.
  3. Add in the sucuk until it starts to brown.
  4. Add in chopped onion, green bell pepper, and celery. Cook 5 minutes until they start to soften.
  5. Add in garlic and spices, stir and cook until fragrant. 
  6. Pour in chicken broth and red beans. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to low. Simmer covered for 15 minutes. 
  7. Remove lid and let the stew reduce, mashing some of the beans to help thicken. Add tabasco sauce, and add salt and pepper to taste.
  8. Serve over rice with done buttered biscuit. Garnish with fresh parsley.
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BONUS: Cheesy, Done Buttered Biscuits

Ingredients: 

  • 113 grams butter, melted
  • 1 cup yogurt, plain
  • 2 cups Bisquick mix (recipe below)
  • 1 cup shredded cheese of your choice (I used kaşar)

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 350 F/175 C. Grease or line a muffin tin.
  2. Mix all ingredients until fully incorporated.
  3. Bake for 25-30 minutes until lightly browned.
Bisquick Mix Ingredients:
  • 6 cups all-purpose flour, sifted
  • 3 Tbsp. baking powder
  • 1 Tbsp salt
  • ½ cup butter, cold cut in cubes
Directions:
  1. Whisk together dry ingredients, then cut utter into flour mixture until the texture of course sand. 
  2. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to four months. 
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Now tell me:

  • Have you ever updated a recipe you grew up with based on what’s available where you live now?
  • What’s a dish you grew up eating that didn’t originate in your hometown?
  • Have you tried this red beans and rice recipe?
  • How did it turn out for you?

Share your thoughts in the comments below!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Nia McRay from @Tastes_Like_Turkey

I am a lover of words and stories, student of culture, amateur photographer, adult cross-cultural kid, English tutor to TCKs (Third Culture Kids), and aspiring foodie. We will probably be instant friends if you give me good coffee, invite me to cook with you, or start a conversation with me about personalities, culture, and how the two intersect. I’m a life-long nerd, believer, and creative-in-the-works. I am all about the journey, so traveling and cross-cultural living is always something that has captured my heart and inspired my imagination. 

In 2016, after teaching in an inner-city school and needing a change of pace, I spent a year abroad in Izmir, Turkey with a friend. I absolutely fell in love with the city and the people. The conveniences of a big city with a friendly, slow-pace-of-life atmosphere is all found between the mountains and the sea. What’s not to love? So, after my year of adventure, I knew I wanted to come back to Izmir to live. 

Positioned on the perch of Asia, Europe, and the Middle East, Turkey is both a mix of cultures, and a unique culture all its own. The more I learn, the more I want to learn, and this desire to learn is what drives me to write. As a pretty quiet person, I write to learn, to discover, and to process. As someone who grew up in a cross-cultural context, Turkey’s diversity and mix of cultures is something I personally relate to. Plus, if you’ve ever tasted Turkish food, you know that it is definitely something to write home about. I’m really grateful for the opportunity to contribute to the Funks’ blog and to grow and learn in the process.

FOOD: Wintertime Cabbage, Sucuk, + Potato Fry

Note from Catie: I recently tried out this recipe and loved it! Hardy but also light! We only had sweet potatoes on hand (which we pay crazy extra for in Turkey) and the recipe was just at delicious! You can always add your own extra toppings or maybe even some sesame seeds like we did! Awesome job Nia on another great recipe!

It’s March; daffodils pop up persistently through the cold earth to remind us, despite the chilly winds, that spring will return, that it’s just around the corner. If you’re in the Northern Hemisphere, maybe, like me, you’re tired of the cold weather, tired of the process of bundling up every time you go out the door, and maybe even tired of the same soups and stews you’ve been making through the winter.  When I still want something hearty and warm on a blustery March evening, this fry is an easy and filling meal I can whip up on a weeknight and is surprisingly good reheated. It’s adapted from an Irish dish, so it’s a great option for a St. Patrick’s Day dinner on the 17th

The biggest difference in this recipe from the Irish version is the replacement of “bangers” with sucuk (“soo-jook”), a fermented Turkish sausage made from beef that is full of flavor. You will find sucuk at any butcher’s shop in Turkey with it’s delicious mix of cayenne pepper, garlic, sumac, cumin, and, of course, plenty of salt, along with a host of other spices. It is commonly cooked with fried eggs for kahvalti (Turkish breakfast) or as a topping on pide (Turkish pizza). You can also easily find it at a grill-out on a hot Izmir summer afternoon.  Sucuk is high in fat and sodium, so my recipe doesn’t add salt or much other fat to the dish. However, if you’re opting for a healthier sausage, like a chicken or reduced sodium sausage, you may want some more salt and/or fat to your fry. 

To get your potatoes and cabbage (which is in season right now in Turkey!) to soak that delicious sucuk flavor in, you want to make sure you fry your sucuk first (and remove them from the pan so they don’t burn) add in a little olive oil, and fry your potato cubes in the remaining fat. The hot fat will not only fry your potatoes beautifully, but also add some rich flavor to them. If you are using a non-sucuk sausage, be sure to add garlic to your fry, as well as red pepper flakes if you like a little heat. 

I also add a little vinegar to introduce some acid and brighten the dish. Alternatively, you could add some citrus juice to cut the heaviness of this fry. If you’re using a chicken or pork sausage, you could also experiment by substituting apple cider vinegar for red wine vinegar. Don’t forget to let me know how your fry turned out in the comments below!

Sucuk Potato Cabbage Fry

  • 2 links sucuk, sliced (Or chicken or pork sausage)
  • 1 lb potatoes peeled and chopped into ½ inch cubes
  • ½ cabbage head, chopped
  • 1 tbsp Olive oil
  • 2 Tbsp red wine vinegar
  • Salt, Pepper, garlic powder, and paprika to taste
  1. In a large skillet or dutch oven, fry the sliced sucuk until lightly browned and released fat. Remove sucuk to a plate.
  2. Add enough olive oil to bring total fat to ¼ inch. Mix and allow to heat up. Add potatoes, stirring occasionally to brown all sides of the potatoes.
  3. Once potatoes are mostly soft, add in the cabbage and return the sucuk to the pan. Stir and allow the cabbage to begin to soften. (If adding garlic, add now)
  4. Add the vinegar and deglaze the pan, scratching up the brown bits on the bottom of the pan with a wooden spoon. 
  5. Add paprika, salt and pepper to taste. Afiyet Olsun!

Now tell me:

  • What about you?
  • What’s your favorite type of sausage?
  • Can you find sucuk where you live?
  • Have you tried this fry? How did it turn out for you?
  • What would you change?

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Nia McRay from @Tastes_Like_Turkey

I am a lover of words and stories, student of culture, amateur photographer, adult cross-cultural kid, English tutor to TCKs (Third Culture Kids), and aspiring foodie. We will probably be instant friends if you give me good coffee, invite me to cook with you, or start a conversation with me about personalities, culture, and how the two intersect. I’m a life-long nerd, believer, and creative-in-the-works. I am all about the journey, so traveling and cross-cultural living is always something that has captured my heart and inspired my imagination. 

In 2016, after teaching in an inner-city school and needing a change of pace, I spent a year abroad in Izmir, Turkey with a friend. I absolutely fell in love with the city and the people. The conveniences of a big city with a friendly, slow-pace-of-life atmosphere is all found between the mountains and the sea. What’s not to love? So, after my year of adventure, I knew I wanted to come back to Izmir to live. 

Positioned on the perch of Asia, Europe, and the Middle East, Turkey is both a mix of cultures, and a unique culture all its own. The more I learn, the more I want to learn, and this desire to learn is what drives me to write. As a pretty quiet person, I write to learn, to discover, and to process. As someone who grew up in a cross-cultural context, Turkey’s diversity and mix of cultures is something I personally relate to. Plus, if you’ve ever tasted Turkish food, you know that it is definitely something to write home about. I’m really grateful for the opportunity to contribute to the Funks’ blog and to grow and learn in the process.

Turkish Breakfast Kahvaltı Turkey

TURKEY: 5 Turkish Foods I Love

What comes to mind when you think of Turkish food? A lot of people come to Turkey and they think kebabs and rice. But as someone who took Turkish cooking lessons once a week for a year and a half, there is SO MUCH MORE

ADANA KEBABS IN ADANA – MASSIVE MIX GRILLED PLATE!

Little Recap:

For the month of February (the month of lllooooovvvvveeeee), I am doing a quick little mini LOVE series. Each week I will cover 5 “…” I love about Turkey.

Here is the line up! (scroll to the bottom for all the links)

  • WEEK ONE: 5 Things I love about Turkey 
  • WEEK TWO: 5 Places I love in Turkey
  • WEEK THREE: 5 Foods I love in Turkey 
  • WEEK FOUR: 5 People who also love Turkey too 

DON’T FORGET: FREE PRINT!

If you’re new here I have a newsletter that goes out every month with a free download. I just sent out our first one for this year! This newsletter includes 3 free prints with the Turkish words faith, hope, and love. Please subscribe and access to those freebies will go straight to your mailbox!  

Let’s get started! Read on to learn the 5 FOODS I love in Turkey

1. BEYTI KEBAB

It’s funny that I mentioned kebab’s first, especially after using it as an example of what people assume Turkish food is…  To be fair, it’s a slightly different take on kebab which is probably why I enjoy it more!

Beyti is a Turkish dish consisting of ground beef or lamb, grilled on a skewer and served wrapped in lavas (or flat bread) and topped with tomato sauce and yogurt. Like most Turkish meals there is usually some type rice or bulgar served as a small side (as if the bread it was wrapped in wasn’t enough…) 

Fun Fact: I learned is that this dish is actually named after a Beyti Güler, the owner of the popular restaurant Beyti in Istanbul.

TRY THIS RECIPE AT HOME.

2. ALI NAZIK

Gosh, I love anything with eggplant. Let’s get this straight – TURKISH eggplant. It’s just different than what we have in the states. I even mentioned that eggplant, or aubergine, in my ‘5 things I love about Turkey’ video.

And my favorite eggplant dish? Ali Nazik. 

Ali nazik is a scrumptious Gaziantep specialty. The delicious marriage of char-grilled smoked eggplant puree mixed with yogurt is then topped with tender lamb stew. Ali nazik is sometimes served with rice pilaf and grilled vegetables. Unfortunately, this dish gets overlooked by a lot of foreigners that they’ve never have really good eggplant. So if you come to Turkey please, please, please, give it a chance. That’s all I’m asking because the mixture of the eggplant with the lamb that is so tender on top with makes it so incredibly delicious. 

It really is a feast to all senses and a special dish to share.

TRY THIS RECIPE AT HOME.

3. MEZE

Meze is a selection of small dishes served as appetizers or served as a part of multi-course meals. Mezes are a parts of the Middle East, the Balkans, Greece, and North Africa. You can kind of think of it like a larger portions of Spainish tapas (not free). 

Our neighborhood in Izmir is know for its meze, especially the Rakı-Balık combo. Balık is the Turkish for fish and rakı is the Turkish version of their licorice tasting spirit which personally it’s not my favorite because I don’t love the licorice. Part of the rakı-balık experience is getting all these little side dishes to eat alongside your hand picked fish. I love being able to explore the freshly prepared selections of mezes and choose four or five and then later pick my fish. 

This meal is most definitely a slow and social experience with friends. Everyone sits, chats, eat a little bit at a time, and maybe there will even be singing if a lingering 2 person band comes by to serenade you.

If you are a person who loves everyone ordering different items from the menu so you can ‘try it all’ then THIS is your type of place (and food). It is a great option for those who want to try a little bit of everything.

TRY THESE RECIPES AT HOME.

FollowingTheFunks Turkish Meze

4. KUNEFE

Kunefe is dessert made with shredded filo pastry, soaked in sweet, sugar-based syrup, and typically layered with cheese in the middle.  If you aren’t a fan of super sweet desserts like kadayif or baklava, this is a great combination – something about the mix of cheese and simple syrup balances the flavors out and makes it seem lighter. This dessert is made fresh when ordered and it takes a while baked on the stove. If you are out of restaurant and know you want to this tasty dessert, make sure to tell them at the beginning of your meal. If you forget you’re going to find yourself waiting another 20 minutes.  

I especially love Kunefe with pistachios sprinkles (or if you are in the hazelnut capital of Turkey then maybe hazelnuts would be a good choice!) and a little(actually a lot) scoop of clotted cream, or kaymak in Turkish.  The mixture of shredded wheat, syrup, and cheese sounds odd, but you have to at least try once. 

And yes, you’ll thank me for it. It’s just absolutely delicious.

TRY THIS RECIPE AT HOME.

FollowingTheFunks Turkish Kunefe

5. KAHVALTI

I am sure it isn’t a surprise to those of you who have been following along for any amount of time here. From our blog post write-up, breakfast in Kalkan, video explaining what Turkish Breakfast is, and our recent Black Sea series telling you about the must-trip mıhlama breakfast dish served in Trabzon and Rize, it’s my jam (get it?).

Kahvalti, the Turkish word for breakfast, literally means ‘under coffee’ or a better translation is ‘before coffee’. Turkish breakfast is often diverse and consists of several different foods eaten together with a big pot of çay, or Turkish tea. Turkish kahve, or coffee, comes at the end of the meal. Breakfast in Turkey, traditionally, is family gathering, much like a brunch is for us Americans.  With a line-up of tastes all its own, who wouldn’t look forward to it the night before and WANT to make it a longer, sit-down affair.

What makes Turkish breakfast even more appealing? Every region of turkey has a different type of breakfast tradition or breakfast dishes that they love to serve in their spread. Of course the most common items are usually there: tomatoes, cucumbers, olives, cheeses, eggs, and usually some types of jellies or honey with bread

Turkish breakfast is usually done best on the weekend – during the week families are busy, but usually on a Saturday morning or Sunday morning, families make a point to sit down and have this breakfast or brunch with their families. Our family too has followed this tradition! I LOVE a good brunch on a weekend, and our favorite restaurants in Karsiyaka know us now! (Well, when they are allowed to be opened – stinky covid.) I also appreciate enjoying it with good friends and/or family. 

I’ve got a couple of videos about Turkish breakfast but if you’re curious to learn more about what all could be found in a Turkish breakfast at a restaurant you can watch one of my videos called “What is Turkish Breakfast???”.

TRY THIS LIST GUIDE AT HOME.

FollowingTheFunks Turkish Breakfast Kahvalti
FollowingTheFunks Turkish Breakfast Kahvalti

There you have it! Those are my top five foods I love in Turkey. I think I will have to do a part 2 because I could easily name 5 more!!! 

Check out our matching video over at our YouTube Channel.

LISTEN to our podcast episode about our top 10 favorite Turkish food!

FollowingTheFunks Turkish Meze

Comment below and let me know about some of the questions below:

  • Have you visited Turkey? 
  • Where do you love to visit?
  • Or where would you love to visit one day?

Check out our other Mini LOVE Series videos and blog post too!

  • 5 Things I love about Turkey: BLOG POST (coming soon!) + VIDEO
  • 5 Place I love in Turkey: BLOG POST + VIDEO 
  • 5 Food I love in Turkey: BLOG POST + VIDEO
  • 5 People who love Turkey too: next week

Thank you for watching my mini love series and so thankful for you and I hope you enjoy the freebies!